AdSense Earnings Drop During the Day

Over the last year or two, I’ve moved a lot of my efforts and focus to my more passive income type earnings online, versus just concentrating on my online freelance writing business. One of the facets of making money writing online is advertising. The simplest online ad system is Google AdSense.

AdSense Earnings Adjusted Same Day

Google’s AdSense program has a lot of moving parts. However, recently, I’ve noticed an uptick in a certain quirk related to earnings.

First, Google adjusts your earnings as an AdSense publisher all the time. The most noticeable adjustment occurs every month when your “Estimated Earnings” is converted into the actual earnings they are going to pay out to you. On the second or third day of a new month, Google will post the actual amount you are getting paid. This number is almost always smaller than the estimated earnings you have been shown all month long. For me, it’s usually a pretty insignificant amount, a rounding error, really.

falling adsense earningsDuring the month, if your ad clicks are particularly worthless not converting well, you may be “smart priced” which is a fancy way of saying that the amount you are getting paid per click will be lowered. This keeps advertisers from trying to cut off certain publishers and potentially costing Google revenue. There is no notification that you have been smart priced, nor is this really something talked about on the publisher (AdSense) side. It’s actually something more readily mentioned on the advertiser side (AdWords). Either way, it’s real and it happens, but it usually requires comparing time frames to see it happen.

Honestly, I don’t really have a lot of experience with Smart Pricing. Either it’s been happening to me from the very beginning, or it just doesn’t happen to me enough for me to notice.

AdSense Earnings Dropping Intraday

What I haven’t seen a whole lot of, in my experience, has been Google adjusting your earnings in real-time, or within the same day. However, lately, I’ve started to notice downward earnings adjustments on some of my accounts.

Check out my look at whether Credit Karma is a scam.

To begin, let me just admit that I check my AdSense account a lot. Honestly, I probably check it too much. On the other hand, it’s so easy to just make a quick click in between projects, phone calls, or meetings. I don’t take the time to necessarily drill down into the data, but I do like watching the amount of money I’m earning online go up and up. I also use channels, ad groups, and site by site reports to keep a rather detailed eye on which sites are making what money, and when.

Which brings me to today’s issue.

Recently, I’ve noticed that sometimes a particular website will report something like $67 for the day so far. Then, 30 minutes later, when I check the same channel on the same website, the earnings will have dropped to something like $53. The RPM will have dropped too. Again, I haven’t drilled into this phenomenon a lot (yet), because this is when I’m supposed to be earning money online by doing other stuff, but it would appear that the CPC has been revised downward, not the number of clicks.

What is odd about this is the time frame. I’ve never seen these almost real-time adjustments before. Typically, you either get a lower CPC and you never really notice it unless it is less than previous days, or they adjust your earnings down at the end of the month. I’ve never known Google to lower your earnings midday like this.

I’ll have to do some more digging, I guess.

Has this happened to anyone else? Am I finally being smart-priced, and this is just how it looks? Has Google updated the way AdSense works so that it make quicker, smaller adjustments during the day rather than bigger. all at once adjustments at the end of the month? 

Leave a comment if you have thoughts.

 

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JustRetweet Tip

I mention that I’m testing JustRetweet and have found a couple of interesting quirks.

First, and foremost, retweets definitely boost your Klout score, but in and of themselves, do not necessarily drive more traffic or improve your search rankings, at least not right away.

Second, if you put out an offer with a low credit amount offered for each retweet, it seems that it will still get taken, eventually. What this means is that if you offer, 3 credits, for example, people will still retweet it, but slowly. Apparently only certain users are interested in a retweet for such a low amount. The upside to this approach is that the tweets continue for several days, or even weeks. The downside, is that the people who do, eventually, accept these offers aren’t necessarily power Twitter users. Of course, not too many power Twitter users are doing a lot of retweets anyway.

Third, remember that the entire balance of your OFFER is deducted immediately from your Retweet credits. That means that you pay right away to use this technique, even if it takes several weeks for all of your retweets to happen.

Fourth, there is also the ability to offer people to +1 your post instead of retweeting it. I need to see exactly what this ends up looking like as people are apparently +1-ing your tweet and not the original link that you put inside your tweet.

Anyone else have any tips for using Just Retweet effectively?

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Is JustRetweet Worth It or Not?

JustRetweet is an interesting online social marketing service. The idea is simple. You upload a tweet for Twitter that you want retweeted. Then, other users of the service retweet your tweet for you. Of course, such a system is ripe for abuse, so the website has some interesting mechanisms to avoid turning JustRetweet.com into a scam for spammers.

How To Use JustRetweet

JustRetweet works on a credit system. You can get credits in one of two ways. First, of course, you can pay money for credits. Second, you can earn credits by retweeting other user’s tweets. Either way, you will have to login via your Twitter account. Doing so authorizes the system to make tweets on your behalf, which is how the system keeps track of what you retweet and awards you the credits.

Users offer a certain number of credits for each retweet. To retweet and accept the offer, click Schedule Retweet. The software then builds a tweet for you and sends it to your Twitter account. To avoid stacking up a bunch of retweets all at once in your timeline, there is a built in scheduler. By default, a tweet goes out from Just Retweet every 15 minutes, however, you can adjust it in settings.

How To Get Retweets with JustRetweet.com

Once you have some credits, you can ask users to retweet a tweet for you. Click where it says to submit a retweet. Type what you would like to tweet. Include the link or anything else you like in the tweet.

First, there is a box which you use to set how much you will pay per retweet. Look on the pages where other people have offers to see what the going rate is. For example, if you really want retweets, then you may have to offer 30 credits in some categories, but only 10 in others. Second, you put how many retweets you are willing to pay for, or the maximum number of retweets. The total cost is the amount per retweet times the maximum retweets number. It calculates this number for you where it says, “You will spend X credits.”

just retweet screnshot

So far, so good.

Here is where it gets tricky. The total amount of your offer (per retweet X max. retweets) will be deducted in full, IMMEDIATELY from your account. In other words, if you offer 10 credits for up to 50 retweets, you will pay 500 credits right away, not 5 credits every time someone retweets your post.

This is important for two reasons. First, you can run out of credits faster this way leaving you unable to submit more retweets without earning, or buying, more credits. Second, you pay the full amount, even if you don’t get the full number of retweets. In other words, using the example above, if only 10 people take you up on your offer, you still pay the full 500 credits, not just the 100 credits for the people who actually retweeted. Technically, your offer remains in the system, but it will drop off the recent screen as time goes by.

The best way to use JustRetweet is to offer a small number of maximum retweets at a time. When you offer has been used up, submit a new offer. That way you don’t waste credits paying for retweets that aren’t going to happen. You can also judge the demand at your price point. If you offer 20 credits and get your maximum retweets quickly, then you can try offering 15 credits or 10 credits and save some credits. Conversely, if you get no takers at 20 credits, then you don’t waste credits on a high maximum number of retweets that are never going to happen.

I’ll keep you posted as I experiment with this service and figure out if JustRetweet is worth it or not. If it is worth it, I’ll expand to a full JustRetweet review of the best ways to get the most bang for the buck.

Follow arcticllama on Twitter for more information and details about freelance writing.

Follow FinanceGourmet on Twitter for personal finance advice.

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AdSense CPC Variations

Assuming you already have quality content and some decent traffic, one of the easiest ways to make money writing online is to add AdSense advertising to your websites.

There are a lot of websites and resources out there that explain the basics of how AdSense works. First, you sign up with Google. Then, you add some code to your website. Finally, you profit. Or something like that.

AdSense Quirks

What is harder to find is information about the many quirks of AdSense. For example, if you load your own website, you won’t see the same ads that new visitors to your website see. Google uses cookies to track users (including you on your own website) and tailors the ads to both content and your browsing history. That is why sometimes a Overstock.com ad will seem to follow you all over the internet displaying items you recently viewed. In order to get a truer idea of what visitors to your site might be seeing, make sure to use Privacy Mode or Google Incognito Mode to cover your cookie tracks.

One of the most maddening quirks of AdSense is the variability in how much money you earn. Some things end up making sense over time. For example, your website may earn more money on weekdays and less on weekends, or vice versa. But some things just don’t ever seem to make much sense.

Your Google AdSense reports offer a lot of information about your ads. Click the Performance Reports tab to get detailed information. A graph at the top charts your earnings. A click or two and you can also chart your PageViews and clicks over time as well. Beneath that, a chart lays out even more data.

Where you’ll find one of the most puzzling AdSense quirks is in the CPC column. CPC stands for cost per click and it represents the average amount each click paid on a given day when a visitor clicked on an ad. It’s no surprise that not all ads pay the same amount. However, over a large enough pool of traffic, you’ll find that your CPC tends to stay around a certain amount, with some moderate variation.

quirks in adsense graphicFor example, a website might have a CPC of $1.11 one day, and $1.18 the next, and so on. What gets really weird is that one day, your CPC will be $0.71. There will be nothing really obvious in your analytics or in the AdSense reports to say why. I’ve found that these anomalies occur on different days of the week, different days of the month, multiple time per month, or not at all. There really seems to be no rhyme or reason for it.

What other AdSense quirks do you see? How have you tried to figure out what is going on?

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