AdSense Experiments Microposts

Earning money with AdSense relies primarily on getting enough traffic to make it work. If you get enough traffic, most of the rest works out on its own. Of course, that isn’t necessarily true for a large, multi-writer, website, but for us writers looking to make money writing online on our own, that’s how it works.

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Getting traffic is an ongoing effort. There are many ways to get traffic, but one of the most self-sustaining is to rank highly enough in search engine rankings to get traffic from people looking for your information. There are a lot of factors that go into search rankings, or SERPs. The most important is the number of links pointing at your individual pages. These are called backlinks, and Google and Bing count them to rank your page.

micropostTo keep people from making junk backlinks, the search engines have a lot of different filters, and value different links from different sources. They also tend to not rank certain types of webpages, including those that are very short. Some say that nothing under 300 words will generally show up. Others say 500 words is the minimum.

Either way, if you aren’t looking to rank that particular page, then does a smaller post still have value?

Certainly, a small post can have value for your readers, and it may be that search engines do count them for other factors, such as the “freshness” of your site, or even the backlinks that come off of those posts.

I wrote about microposts over on my freelance writing blog, but since they have the potential to increase earnings, I thought I’d put some thoughts down here as well.

I’ll keep you posted.

 

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All 6 Every Day

I have several different blogs on a lot of different platforms aimed at a lot of different audiences with a lot of different goals. That being the case, I’ve always had the notion that if I could focus on my six different blogs or websites, and update each of them every single day, that things like search rankings, link building, and monetization would largely take care of themselves. Unfortunately, I’ve never really been able to test that theory, in large part because I have other projects as a freelance writer that I’m working on, and updating six blogs every day requires a fair amount of overhead.

daily updates on multiple blogsHowever, after tracking various analytics, traffic, and even some earnings, I’ve noticed a definite correlation between frequency of posting and positive results. However, unlike other people have suggested, I find the best results occur when those regular postings are made across more than one of the websites. In other words, I see better results from posting one or two articles per day, not on one site, but on several sites. Each individual site might go four, five, or sometimes 8 or 10 days between updates, but this still seems to achieve better results than a daily post on a single blog.

Now, I think it’s time to put my writing where my mouth is. Would daily updates across multiple blogs increase traffic, earnings, and even links in a meaningful way? There is only one real way to find out and that is to try it.

I’ve decided to work with six different blogs across multiple topics. Each blog links around a bit to the others, but nothing that would seem like some sort of link scheme. Mostly there are sidebar links to popular pages on other blogs, but I do try and occasionally throw in another links within the text, but only when it’s natural. Or sometimes, I’ll do it like it is an ad or something. Like this:

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More Content More Links

Too many people focus on the fact that daily updates leads to daily indexing by Google. Being indexed quickly is important for news sites, and other real-time endeavors, but for what I do, it isn’t really important. However, a daily update would mean a steadily increasing number of pages to be indexed, marking the blog as fresh. Even more beneficial is that each new post provides several new links. The sidebar links are but one pocket of linking. Each post has tag and categories, those pages get a new link with each new post. Any inserted links, obviously, increases the links incoming to that page. Finally, with a steady update, that means more people have the chance to see something new on an RSS feed, aggregator, or just on regular visits, each of which provides another opportunity to link.

How To Write So Much Content

Clearly, if one is cranking out six blog posts every day, and still hopes to achieve any progress on other projects, you can’t spend two, or even one hour, on every post. In fact, there may be an argument for rotating on a calendar which blog gets the bigger, deeper, longer, posts with more pictures and promotions each day. But, for now, I’m going to wing it, with the in-depth article ideas I have being cranked out where they seem the best fit, or where I have the best motivation each day. The other posts will, of course, not be garbage, but will, by necessity, have to be briefer, or faster in some way to write.

The holidays are approaching, so this may be a fools errand. On the other hand, there is no time like the present. Even three a day, or six every other day should show some results if I’m correct.

So, without further ado, this is ONE.

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AdSense Earnings Drop During the Day

Over the last year or two, I’ve moved a lot of my efforts and focus to my more passive income type earnings online, versus just concentrating on my online freelance writing business. One of the facets of making money writing online is advertising. The simplest online ad system is Google AdSense.

AdSense Earnings Adjusted Same Day

Google’s AdSense program has a lot of moving parts. However, recently, I’ve noticed an uptick in a certain quirk related to earnings.

First, Google adjusts your earnings as an AdSense publisher all the time. The most noticeable adjustment occurs every month when your “Estimated Earnings” is converted into the actual earnings they are going to pay out to you. On the second or third day of a new month, Google will post the actual amount you are getting paid. This number is almost always smaller than the estimated earnings you have been shown all month long. For me, it’s usually a pretty insignificant amount, a rounding error, really.

falling adsense earningsDuring the month, if your ad clicks are particularly worthless not converting well, you may be “smart priced” which is a fancy way of saying that the amount you are getting paid per click will be lowered. This keeps advertisers from trying to cut off certain publishers and potentially costing Google revenue. There is no notification that you have been smart priced, nor is this really something talked about on the publisher (AdSense) side. It’s actually something more readily mentioned on the advertiser side (AdWords). Either way, it’s real and it happens, but it usually requires comparing time frames to see it happen.

Honestly, I don’t really have a lot of experience with Smart Pricing. Either it’s been happening to me from the very beginning, or it just doesn’t happen to me enough for me to notice.

AdSense Earnings Dropping Intraday

What I haven’t seen a whole lot of, in my experience, has been Google adjusting your earnings in real-time, or within the same day. However, lately, I’ve started to notice downward earnings adjustments on some of my accounts.

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To begin, let me just admit that I check my AdSense account a lot. Honestly, I probably check it too much. On the other hand, it’s so easy to just make a quick click in between projects, phone calls, or meetings. I don’t take the time to necessarily drill down into the data, but I do like watching the amount of money I’m earning online go up and up. I also use channels, ad groups, and site by site reports to keep a rather detailed eye on which sites are making what money, and when.

Which brings me to today’s issue.

Recently, I’ve noticed that sometimes a particular website will report something like $67 for the day so far. Then, 30 minutes later, when I check the same channel on the same website, the earnings will have dropped to something like $53. The RPM will have dropped too. Again, I haven’t drilled into this phenomenon a lot (yet), because this is when I’m supposed to be earning money online by doing other stuff, but it would appear that the CPC has been revised downward, not the number of clicks.

What is odd about this is the time frame. I’ve never seen these almost real-time adjustments before. Typically, you either get a lower CPC and you never really notice it unless it is less than previous days, or they adjust your earnings down at the end of the month. I’ve never known Google to lower your earnings midday like this.

I’ll have to do some more digging, I guess.

Has this happened to anyone else? Am I finally being smart-priced, and this is just how it looks? Has Google updated the way AdSense works so that it make quicker, smaller adjustments during the day rather than bigger. all at once adjustments at the end of the month? 

Leave a comment if you have thoughts.

 

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JustRetweet Tip

I mention that I’m testing JustRetweet and have found a couple of interesting quirks.

First, and foremost, retweets definitely boost your Klout score, but in and of themselves, do not necessarily drive more traffic or improve your search rankings, at least not right away.

Second, if you put out an offer with a low credit amount offered for each retweet, it seems that it will still get taken, eventually. What this means is that if you offer, 3 credits, for example, people will still retweet it, but slowly. Apparently only certain users are interested in a retweet for such a low amount. The upside to this approach is that the tweets continue for several days, or even weeks. The downside, is that the people who do, eventually, accept these offers aren’t necessarily power Twitter users. Of course, not too many power Twitter users are doing a lot of retweets anyway.

Third, remember that the entire balance of your OFFER is deducted immediately from your Retweet credits. That means that you pay right away to use this technique, even if it takes several weeks for all of your retweets to happen.

Fourth, there is also the ability to offer people to +1 your post instead of retweeting it. I need to see exactly what this ends up looking like as people are apparently +1-ing your tweet and not the original link that you put inside your tweet.

Anyone else have any tips for using Just Retweet effectively?

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