Is JustRetweet Worth It or Not?

JustRetweet is an interesting online social marketing service. The idea is simple. You upload a tweet for Twitter that you want retweeted. Then, other users of the service retweet your tweet for you. Of course, such a system is ripe for abuse, so the website has some interesting mechanisms to avoid turning JustRetweet.com into a scam for spammers.

How To Use JustRetweet

JustRetweet works on a credit system. You can get credits in one of two ways. First, of course, you can pay money for credits. Second, you can earn credits by retweeting other user’s tweets. Either way, you will have to login via your Twitter account. Doing so authorizes the system to make tweets on your behalf, which is how the system keeps track of what you retweet and awards you the credits.

Users offer a certain number of credits for each retweet. To retweet and accept the offer, click Schedule Retweet. The software then builds a tweet for you and sends it to your Twitter account. To avoid stacking up a bunch of retweets all at once in your timeline, there is a built in scheduler. By default, a tweet goes out from Just Retweet every 15 minutes, however, you can adjust it in settings.

How To Get Retweets with JustRetweet.com

Once you have some credits, you can ask users to retweet a tweet for you. Click where it says to submit a retweet. Type what you would like to tweet. Include the link or anything else you like in the tweet.

First, there is a box which you use to set how much you will pay per retweet. Look on the pages where other people have offers to see what the going rate is. For example, if you really want retweets, then you may have to offer 30 credits in some categories, but only 10 in others. Second, you put how many retweets you are willing to pay for, or the maximum number of retweets. The total cost is the amount per retweet times the maximum retweets number. It calculates this number for you where it says, “You will spend X credits.”

just retweet screnshot

So far, so good.

Here is where it gets tricky. The total amount of your offer (per retweet X max. retweets) will be deducted in full, IMMEDIATELY from your account. In other words, if you offer 10 credits for up to 50 retweets, you will pay 500 credits right away, not 5 credits every time someone retweets your post.

This is important for two reasons. First, you can run out of credits faster this way leaving you unable to submit more retweets without earning, or buying, more credits. Second, you pay the full amount, even if you don’t get the full number of retweets. In other words, using the example above, if only 10 people take you up on your offer, you still pay the full 500 credits, not just the 100 credits for the people who actually retweeted. Technically, your offer remains in the system, but it will drop off the recent screen as time goes by.

The best way to use JustRetweet is to offer a small number of maximum retweets at a time. When you offer has been used up, submit a new offer. That way you don’t waste credits paying for retweets that aren’t going to happen. You can also judge the demand at your price point. If you offer 20 credits and get your maximum retweets quickly, then you can try offering 15 credits or 10 credits and save some credits. Conversely, if you get no takers at 20 credits, then you don’t waste credits on a high maximum number of retweets that are never going to happen.

I’ll keep you posted as I experiment with this service and figure out if JustRetweet is worth it or not. If it is worth it, I’ll expand to a full JustRetweet review of the best ways to get the most bang for the buck.

Follow arcticllama on Twitter for more information and details about freelance writing.

Follow FinanceGourmet on Twitter for personal finance advice.

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AdSense CPC Variations

Assuming you already have quality content and some decent traffic, one of the easiest ways to make money writing online is to add AdSense advertising to your websites.

There are a lot of websites and resources out there that explain the basics of how AdSense works. First, you sign up with Google. Then, you add some code to your website. Finally, you profit. Or something like that.

AdSense Quirks

What is harder to find is information about the many quirks of AdSense. For example, if you load your own website, you won’t see the same ads that new visitors to your website see. Google uses cookies to track users (including you on your own website) and tailors the ads to both content and your browsing history. That is why sometimes a Overstock.com ad will seem to follow you all over the internet displaying items you recently viewed. In order to get a truer idea of what visitors to your site might be seeing, make sure to use Privacy Mode or Google Incognito Mode to cover your cookie tracks.

One of the most maddening quirks of AdSense is the variability in how much money you earn. Some things end up making sense over time. For example, your website may earn more money on weekdays and less on weekends, or vice versa. But some things just don’t ever seem to make much sense.

Your Google AdSense reports offer a lot of information about your ads. Click the Performance Reports tab to get detailed information. A graph at the top charts your earnings. A click or two and you can also chart your PageViews and clicks over time as well. Beneath that, a chart lays out even more data.

Where you’ll find one of the most puzzling AdSense quirks is in the CPC column. CPC stands for cost per click and it represents the average amount each click paid on a given day when a visitor clicked on an ad. It’s no surprise that not all ads pay the same amount. However, over a large enough pool of traffic, you’ll find that your CPC tends to stay around a certain amount, with some moderate variation.

quirks in adsense graphicFor example, a website might have a CPC of $1.11 one day, and $1.18 the next, and so on. What gets really weird is that one day, your CPC will be $0.71. There will be nothing really obvious in your analytics or in the AdSense reports to say why. I’ve found that these anomalies occur on different days of the week, different days of the month, multiple time per month, or not at all. There really seems to be no rhyme or reason for it.

What other AdSense quirks do you see? How have you tried to figure out what is going on?

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SEO and Traffic Tools

I make over a $1,000 per month blogging on various websites. Technically, I make over $1,000 per month from AdSense and not blogging, but it’s the blogs that bring in the AdSense money, so I suppose it is all relative.

The point is that there is an amazing array of SEO tools and traffic analysis tools and so on our there. I’d like to try some of them out, and since I do make some decent cash from my writing, one might think that I would be willing to shell out $50 or so to try some of them out. And, frankly, I would except they all seem to cost $50 PER MONTH or worse.

Now, I’m all for spending money to make money, and all that, but I can’t help but wonder how much those tools are really worth. After all, I can check my rankings anytime I want for free by running the actually Google searches manually. Of course, that’s the rub, “manually.”

Still, $50 per month is $600 per year. That isn’t cheap, and that is for just ONE tool. What if I liked the rank tracker from one tool, the link checker from another tool and some sort of SEO checkup thing from another tool? That might be $150 per month, or over 10 percent of my income.

My only conclusion can be that either there are a lot of people out there making a lot more money with their websites than me, or that there are a lot of people out there who aren’t spending their money very wisely. I guess the question is how much actual value does the average website publisher make from those tools? After all, I’m already making $1K without them. Would I double my earnings? Triple?

Think about it this way. If I was able to generate a more realistic 10 percent improvement on my income that would be $100 per month, of which $50 per month would go to the cost of the tool. I’m not sure that works out for our heroes.

Speaking of which, I recently dropped $50 to upgrade to the Pro IMAuotmator. I’ll write about it soon.

 

What are your thoughts about SEO tools, search ranking monitoring tools, and link tools? Any you can’t live without? Any that are very worth it from a pure additional income standpoint?

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WordPress Update Version 3.3.2

A new version of WordPress has just been released.

If you are using WordPress for your blogs, it’s time to start considering updating them. This update is a minor one. It’s mostly security updates with a couple of bug fixes. As always, staying current helps protect your websites from hacking and malware.

You can update through your WordPress Dashboard by clicking the update now button.

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